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Alex's Lemonade Stand Foundation Blog

Welcome to the official blog of Alex's Lemonade Stand Foundation!


April 25, 2019
“Data is the lifeblood of science,” says Jaclyn Taroni, PhD, data scientist at the CCDL, “Data can better equip researchers to ask the really important scientific questions and to do so efficiently and robustly, as they work towards cures for childhood cancer.”

“Data is the lifeblood of science,” says Jaclyn Taroni, PhD, data scientist at the Childhood Cancer Data Lab.

by Trish Adkins

When you think of childhood cancer research, you may imagine samples in test tubes and microscopes or a drug being tested in a clinic. And while childhood cancer research certainly happens in a biochem lab and in a clinic, it also happens inside the Childhood Cancer Data Lab (CCDL).  Funded by ALSF, the CCDL team is working to harness the power of big data and use it to cure childhood cancer. 

So what is big data? 

“Data is the lifeblood of science,” says Jaclyn... Read More

April 1, 2019
RUNX1 researcher Eirini Papapetrou, MD, PhD from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

Eirini Papapetrou, MD, PhD from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

by Trish Adkins

When Eirini Papapetrou, MD, PhD from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai started her lab, she devoted her research to developing specialized iPSC models. 

This might not mean a lot to those of us who are not researchers. But these models—made from patient-derived cells—could be the key to understanding the drivers behind certain types of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), one of the most difficult and deadliest types of pediatric leukemia. 

The development of iPSC... Read More

March 8, 2019
  • Dr. Michelle Monje, pictured here at her lab at Stanford University. In addition to DIPG research, Dr. Monje also studies spinal cord tumors, which can share genetic characteristics similar to high-grade gliomas like DIPG. Dr. Monje is also the co-chair for the High-Grade Glioma section at ALSF's Crazy 8 meeting this September in Philadelphia.
    Michelle Monje, pictured here at her lab at Stanford University. In addition to DIPG research, Dr. Monje also studies spinal cord tumors, which can share genetic characteristics similar to high-grade gliomas like DIPG. Dr. Monje is also the co-chair for the High-Grade Glioma section at ALSF's Crazy 8 meeting this September in Philadelphia.
  • Dr. Catherine Flores, pictured above, with Sawyer. Sawyer dreamed of being a scientist and Dr. Flores opened her lab up to him for the day. Sadly Sawyer passed away from a brain tumor.  “As lab researchers, we generally don't come in contact with patients, but it was amazing to see who we are trying to help. Interacting with him during a fun time made me want to work even harder. It also made me realize that receiving grants and manuscripts (our metrics as academics) are great, but they are nothing compared
    Dr. Catherine Flores, pictured above, with Sawyer. Sawyer dreamed of being a scientist and Dr. Flores opened her lab up to him for the day. Sadly Sawyer passed away from a brain tumor. “As lab researchers, we generally don't come in contact with patients, but it was amazing to see who we are trying to help. Interacting with him during a fun time made me want to work even harder. It also made me realize that receiving grants and manuscripts (our metrics as academics) are great, but they are nothing compared to actually finding a cure,” said Dr. Flores
  • ALSF POST-Grantee Sabrina Wang is continuing her pediatric oncology education and career as a research technologist—focusing on gathering, cataloging and organizing data—with Dr. Rubens at Johns Hopkins.
    ALSF POST-Grantee Sabrina Wang is continuing her pediatric oncology education and career as a research technologist—focusing on gathering, cataloging and organizing data—with Dr. Rubens at Johns Hopkins.
  • Dr. Jean Mulcahy-Levy’s research focuses on how blocking a cellular process called autophagy could eliminate brains tumors that have a specific mutation. All cells—both normal and cancer cells—perform autophagy, which is basically a cell-recycling program.
    Dr. Jean Mulcahy-Levy’s research focuses on how blocking a cellular process called autophagy could eliminate brains tumors that have a specific mutation. All cells—both normal and cancer cells—perform autophagy, which is basically a cell-recycling program.
  •  Dr. Jennifer Foster, a pediatric oncologist at Texas Children’s Cancer Center, pictured above with 13-year-old Eden Green, who is battling a rare one-of-a-kind tumor. Dr. Foster is leading a clinical trial that focuses on the treatment of relapsed solid tumors.
    Dr. Jennifer Foster, a pediatric oncologist at Texas Children’s Cancer Center, pictured above with 13-year-old Eden Green, who is battling a rare one-of-a-kind tumor. Dr. Foster is leading a clinical trial that focuses on the treatment of relapsed solid tumors.

by Trish Adkins

According to the UNESCO Institute of Statistics, less than 30-percent of the world’s scientific researchers are women.  As the world works to narrow the gender gap, women researchers are working on cures for childhood cancer—both in the lab and the clinic.

In honor of International Women’s Day and Women’s History Month in March, meet five women leading the way to cures for childhood cancer:

Dr. Catherine Flores 

Being a researcher is not a 9-... Read More

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