Childhood Cancer

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Hodgkin Lymphoma

Hodgkin lymphoma is a type of lymphoma defined by the presence of a specific type of cancerous cell called Reed-Sternberg cells. Like all lymphomas, Hodgkin lymphoma originates in the lymphatic system. 

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Latest Hodgkin Lymphoma grants

Sumit Gupta, MD, PhD, Principal Investigator
Hospital for Sick Children
Young Investigator Grants, Awarded 2015
Jean Nakamura, Principal Investigator
University of California San Francisco
Young Investigator Grants, Awarded 2011

Latest Hodgkin Lymphoma blog posts

April 20, 2018

by Trish Adkins

Childhood lymphoma arises from the immune system cells and occurs when those cells grow in an uncontrolled and uncoordinated way. While it shares some similarities with leukemia, lymphoma often settles in the lymph nodes of the body, instead of in the bloodstream.

Each type of lymphoma is named by its cell of origin and this dictates treatment protocol. The good news: the most common types of lymphoma (Hodgkin, Non-Hodgkin, Burkitt) have relatively high cure rates as compared to other types of childhood cancer.  

The bad news: cure rates are not 100-percent and even those children who are cured of primary lymphoma can face a lifetime of side effects including cardiac dysfunction and even secondary cancers. 

But, there is hope on the horizon. Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation (ALSF) funded researchers so they could continue to search for safer treatments and cures for children battling lymphoma. Meet some of these childhood cancer heroes and the researchers making a difference every day:

Miracle Cure: Zach

When Zach was 5 years old, he was diagnosed with anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL), an extremely rare type of non-Hodgkin lymphoma. While still in treatment, Zach’s lymphoma relapsed. As Zach became sicker and his prognosis worsened, his parents felt they were out of options. Traditional chemotherapy was not working and, in fact, was making Zach sicker. Zach was running out of time. 

Zach’s lymphoma tested positive for ALK, an abnormal gene that fuels certain types of cancer. ALSF-funded research made a clinical trial for a new drug possible, bringing hope to his family. This drug, known as crizotinib, targets and turns off the ALK gene. Days after taking the drug, Zach was feeling better and his cancer was disappearing. 

Now Zach is 12 years old and cancer-free. 

Breakthrough Research: Dr. Yael Mosse, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia 

Funded by an ALSF Reach grant, Dr. Yael Mosse led the research team at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia that made Zach’s treatment possible. Her team theorized that since crizotinib worked in ALK-positive lung cancer in adults, it could be the hope children battling ALK-positive cancer needed. 

And since crizotinib is a targeted therapy that just attacks one gene, it has fewer side effects as compared to chemotherapy. 

Dr. Mosse’s clinical trial enrolled 30 children--including Zach. Zach was seven out of the eight children with the same type of lymphoma that received the same miraculous cure. The trial also tested crizotinib in children battling ALK-positive neuroblastoma with successful results. 

Hero (and Boss Lady) Sydnie 

The day Sydnie, age 13, was diagnosed with Hodgkin lymphoma she cried for a moment and then decided no one else was allowed to cry in front of her.

Then, Sydnie asked her mom to dye her blonde hair purple, pink and blue—because she knew she was going to lose it anyway. When she lost her hair as a result of chemotherapy, she wanted to shave her head right away because, as Sydnie, declared, cancer was not going to determine if she was bald or not. It was up to her.

“I won’t let cancer be the boss of me,” Sydnie said. 

Hodgkin lymphoma has a relatively high cure rate (80-90% in most cases) but requires immediate chemotherapy and radiation. Sydnie endured nine months of chemotherapy and 10 days of radiation. 

Today, she is cancer-free.
 
Translating Research into Treatments: Dr. Helen Heslop, Baylor College of Medicine 

Dr. Helen Heslop, a researcher at Baylor College of Medicine (an ALSF Center of Excellence) and Texas Children's Hospital focuses her work on translational research, which combines testing in the lab with patient studies. This type of research can help accelerate new therapies to clinical trials and someday, as new standards of care. Of particular interest to Dr. Heslop is how immunotherapy treatments, like CAR T cell immunotherapy, could help children with hard-to-treat lymphoma and also lead to safer frontline treatments. 
 
“The grants that ALSF provides support early career research, innovative, high-risk ideas and early phase trials that are critical for clinicians and scientists as they test approaches to improve outcomes,” said Dr. Heslop. 
 
Learn about lymphoma research and meet more childhood cancer heroes, here

December 1, 2017

by Adam Paris, ALSF

John Szigety was diagnosed at age 10 with Hodgkin lymphoma and underwent treatment at Memorial Sloan Kettering Hospital and Hackensack University Medical Center. After eight months of treatment, he suffered a relapse in early 2006, but completed treatment that June. Today, he is 11 years cancer-free. 

Amjad Shaikh was diagnosed just before his 9th birthday with leukemia and went through his entire treatment schedule at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) for four years, before entering remission. Today, he is cancer-free. Amjad Shaikh

Both are childhood cancer survivors and medical school students who participated in Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation’s (ALSF) Pediatric Oncology Student Training (POST) grant program this past summer. They each felt the immense pride of being able to give back and help kids fight for their lives just like they did. They talked about the experience of beating cancer as kids and now, as researchers, searching for a cure.

Can you describe your work this summer as a POST student?
John Szigety (JS): I was looking at the effect of a drug on tumor progression and cell replication. The doctor I worked with at CHOP, Dr. Sarah Tasian, was investigating how to treat cancers with a specific mutation that makes the disease especially aggressive.
Amjad Shaikh (AS): I looked at CHOP and found an opportunity to study pediatric leukemia. I worked on studying mortalities associated with hospital characteristics and what a hospital can do to improve treatments or survival rates in kids fighting the same kind of cancer that I did.

 

Pictured: Amjad Shaikh

What was most meaningful about this experience?
JS: It was meaningful to see the different roles that a pediatric oncologist plays. As a patient, I only saw my oncologist, Dr. Steven Halpern, as a clinician. Dr. Tasian showed me how big of a role research plays in her life as a physician. That was new information to me.
AS: Part of it was that I got to see a lot of pediatric patients. The fact that I was on the other side and I understood from a clinical and medical level what was going on, I felt that maybe given a couple years I could be the person who was helping them out.

Was there a particular individual who inspired you to pursue pediatric oncology? 
JS: Dr. Halpern. When I was feeling miserable or having a bad day, he was receptive to me about how to change my regimen to make it more manageable. He would stop in my room during treatment to say hello or play board games. The cliché is that he treated me like a person and not an illness, but it's true. He's a big reason why I want to go into this field.
AS: My oncologist, Dr. Stephen Grupp. A few years after treatment, he told me he had been diagnosed with cancer and was undergoing treatment. It was a bit shocking because I had never seen an adult go through chemo. It left an impression that despite the fact he was going through chemo, and knowing what that was like, he still came in and treated kids. That meant a lot to me. It guided my philosophy in med school and framed my outlook for how a doctor should be. 

What did this POST opportunity and the chance to help other kids fight cancer mean to you?
JS: It was an honor. Since my diagnosis, I have wanted to help children affected by cancer. I've worked at Camp Kesem (summer camps hosted for kids whose parents have cancer), fundraised for various charities and pursued an education that brought me to medical school. The POST grant helped me contribute in another important way by investigating potential new treatments. While I didn't cure cancer or even come close, I am proud to say that I helped.
AS: It meant the world. Seeing Dr. Grupp and the team of physicians at CHOP, that’s my vision for the kind of doctor I’d like to be. 

As someone who survived childhood cancer, what does ALSF represent to you?
JS: In a word, ALSF represents hope. By supporting research across the country, ALSF represents the future of medical treatments and all the advances that are yet to come. 
AS: I think it’s a great organization for helping to develop a new generation of physicians and researchers who are going to continue these advancements. 

What are your goals and aspirations going forward?
JS: My goals are to become a pediatric oncologist and help treat children who have to fight for their lives. As a survivor, I have an understanding of how these pediatric cancer patients feel and I hope to help my future patients through the frightening and overwhelming experience of battling cancer.
AS: Especially after this summer I’m definitely set on a career in oncology. I’m not 100% sure how I want to go about it, since I'm still exploring all the specialties, but pediatric oncology is at the top of my list.

Each year, ALSF provides grants opportunities to medical students through the POST grant program. Read more about our POST grants here.