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Meet Arnav, U.S. Junior National Cyclist and Osteosarcoma Survivor

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Then, just weeks later, Arnav’s leg began bothering him. He developed a noticeable limp—but it seemed typical for an athlete who was training four to six hours a day, six days a week. Rest and ice did nothing to curb the pain. Arnav kept racing, even though his leg ached. Then, Arnav had an MRI which revealed osteosarcoma, the most common type of bone cancer in children.

When 14-year-old U.S. Junior National Cyclist Arnav, fell off his bike and shattered his helmet during a race, the race official suggested he drop out. 

Arnav shook off the fall and went on to finish 9th.

Then, just weeks later, Arnav’s leg began bothering him. He developed a noticeable limp—but it seemed typical for an athlete who was training four to six hours a day, six days a week. Rest and ice did nothing to curb the pain. Arnav kept racing, even though his leg ached. Then, Arnav had an MRI which revealed osteosarcoma, the most common type of bone cancer in children. Typically diagnosed in adolescence and more frequently in boys, osteosarcoma starts as pain around a joint. Often, like in Arnav’s case, the pain is attributed to a sports injury. 

A decade ago, Arnav’s diagnosis would have meant certain amputation.

You can’t ride a bike, if you don’t have a working leg. 

Lucky for Arnav and thanks to innovation in the field of orthopedic oncology, most children battling osteosarcoma today get a chance to save their leg and keep their mobility. 

For Arnav, who is now 15 years old, that meant he could hold on to his cycling dreams. Watch more of Arnav’s inspiring story of positivity and victory in the face near-certain defeat: