ALSF Research Stories

Women Curing Childhood Cancer: Meet Future Doctor Sabrina Wang

by Trish Adkins, ALSF

For as long as she can remember Sabrina Wang, a student at Johns Hopkins University in Maryland, wanted to be a scientist. As an undergraduate student, Sabrina received a 2016 Pediatric Oncology Student Training (POST) grant from Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation (ALSF) to work with Drs. Eric Raabe, Charles Eberhart and Jeffrey Rubens at Johns Hopkins. 

Heart Health and Childhood Cancer: 10 Things You Need To Know

Childhood cancer survivors are 7 times more likely to experience cardiac dysfunction at some point in their lives than other children. Harsh treatments from some types of high-dose chemotherapy and radiation therapy increase their risk of having an irregular heartbeat, weakening the heart muscle and even hardening of the arteries. 

This is one of the many reasons why childhood cancer research is so important—cures should not come at the cost of heart health. 

5 Trends in Childhood Cancer Research

by Trish Adkins

Gone are the days of just chemotherapy and radiation. Today’s researchers and oncologists are combining the traditional tools with cutting-edge biological medicine, genetic analysis and novel therapeutics in the labs and clinics. 

Childhood cancer researchers are working hard towards better treatments and more cures every single day. Here are five trends in research today:

1. Treating the patient, not just the cancer

Reaching for cures: Meet the latest ALSF Childhood Cancer Research Grantees

The process of bringing an idea from the lab to clinical trial can take years. Researchers are not only required to prove the effectiveness of their science, they also need to get FDA approval to provide an experimental therapy to actual patients. On top of all this, researchers also must ensure that their home hospital has the correct infrastructure in place to administer a clinical trial.

Seven Things $1 Million Can Do For Children With Cancer


During Alex’s Million Mile in September, supporters raised over $1 million for childhood cancer research and supportive services for families! All year long, Alex’s Lemonade Stand Foundation (ALSF) uses this money to fund projects at every stage of research to ensure cures are being found today and for the future. 

Here are seven ways $1 million helps children with cancer:

In the Genes: How Science Is Fighting Ewing’s Sarcoma

by Trish Adkins

It all starts with what seems to be normal pain and a bump. 

To a parent, their child is just complaining about something painful on their arm, leg or pelvis. The pain worsens. The bump lingers. And after many visits to the doctor, a diagnosis is finally made—Ewing’s sarcoma, the second most common type of childhood bone cancer